Myths debunked 😜

Standard

MYTH 1: “GROWTH REQUIRES VARIETY”
It’s disheartening to see a young lifter wander through a weight room and try every isolation machine in the name of “muscle confusion.” One of the worst myths is that growth requires extreme exercise variation to hit a muscle from X, Y, and Z angles.

LET’S PUT A BLADE THROUGH THIS DRAGON’S HEART FOR GOOD! MUSCLES NEED TENSION AND VOLUME TO GROW.
Let’s put a blade through this dragon’s heart for good! Muscles need tension and volume to grow. Tension comes from weight that makes the brain, and the nervous system, recognize that it’s important to use and build more muscle. It’s not the result of a cornucopia of isolation exercises; it’s the result of putting a heavy barbell in the hands or on the back and moving it. ( by Todd Bumgardener)

MYTH 2: “MORE IS BETTER WHEN IT COMES TO VOLUME”
A thousand sets of a thousand reps of a thousand exercisesβ€”it’s a program that flexed a thousand biceps and is totally bunk. I don’t know of a program set up exactly that way, but you probably know what I’m talking about. We’ve seen or possibly been the person that does countless reps of one exercise, moves on to a tandem of exercises, and exhibits the same behavior. It’s erroneous, shameful, and unproductive.

More seems better in theory, only it’s not. An overabundant exercise buffet limits training intensity by pushing volume too high. Training advancement becomes increasingly difficult with constant exercise variation and outrageous volume. Advancement comes from understanding your needs in relation to your goals and tailoring your program to meet those needs, not from a circus full of high-volume exercises.

MYTH 3: “CARBS ARE EVIL😈”
People will try to lose fat while gaining muscle, so they cut consumption of carbohydrates severely. The misconception here is that without carbs, high-intensity activities cannot be properly sustained. That means you can’t add weight to the bar and so you might struggle to grow.

MYTH 4: “Lifting Makes Women Look Masculine”
TRUTH: Lifting builds muscle and burns fat.
Countless studies have shown that women who do resistance training are stronger, leaner, and healthier than women who do not. What that resistance training does to your physique is completely up to you and your DNA.
Even in the world of fitness, female physiques range from the brawny, like Dana Linn Bailey; to the athletic, like Camille Leblanc-Bazinet; to the slender, like India Paulino. Each of these women uses resistance training to sculpt a desired body.
The differences in their physiques come from genetics, how they eat, and the movements, volume, intensity, and load they use in their programming. Just like these women, you need a training regimen that reflects how you want to perform and what you want to look like.

MYTH 5: “If You Aren’t Sore The Next Day, Your Workout Wasn’t Hard Enough”
Soreness is inflammation and the chemical response to inflammation. The only yardstick by which you need to measure progress is that of your goal. There are Olympic athletes who haven’t felt soreness in years. Judge your workout by what happens during that workout.

If you hit a PR, and you aren’t sore the next day, it doesn’t mean you didn’t expend enough energy, it means your energy expenditure was just right. Judging your progress by a pain threshold is incorrectβ€”you don’t have to have soreness to gain muscle size or strength.

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